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Best ad-blockers for Twitch in 2022

Want to stop ads on Twitch slowing you down? In this guide, we explain what you should look for in a Twitch ad-blocker, which ones we've found do the best job, and why you should consider using a VPN to access Twitch and bypass those annoying ads.

What are the best ad-blockers for Twitch in 2022?

Here's a quick summary of the best ad-blockers for Twitch. For more information as to why we chose these services, keep scrolling for our in-depth analysis.

  1. AdLock - The best ad-blocker for Twitch, and it's absolutely packed with features.
  2. AdGuard - A stand-alone ad-block solution for Windows, iOS and mobile devices.
  3. uBlock Origin - uBlock Origin is both a highly effective and impressively customizable ad-blocking solution.
  4. CyberSec (NordVPN) - NordVPN's bundled security solution for blocking ads, malware and more, at no extra cost!
  5. Total Adblock

What should I look for in an ad-blocker for Twitch?

The single most important thing to look for in any ad-blocking or VPN solution for Twitch is that it actually works – blocking adverts without also subjecting you to the dread purple screen of doom! The services we recommend here have been personally tested by the ProPrivacy team, and we can confirm that they do, indeed, work with Twitch in 2022, allowing you to view your favourite streams without being subjected to unskippable advertising.

The best Twitch ad-blockers | Detailed analysis

AdLock is a stand-alone ad-blocker, capable of protecting you from malware, unwanted advertising and suspicious websites.

  • Pricing

    • 60 months: $1.51/mth
      57% OFF
    • 12 months: $2.94/mth
      17% OFF
    • 1 month: $3.5/mth
  • Pros

    • Impressive ad blocking
    • Blocks adverts, trackers and more
    • Lots of useful statistics and information
    • Highly customizable
  • Cons

    • No free tier
    • Still detected by some sites
  • Website


AdLock is an impressive stand-alone ad-blocking product, with a range of reporting an analytics options for the curious as well as all the usual features you would expect from any ad-blocker. While it is not a free product, and there are plenty of trustworthy free options out there, I feel AdLock is worth the price of admission.


Feature rich


Most free ad-blocking extensions and apps have minimalist UIs, offering only the barest levels of information or customization to their users. AdLock, on the other hand, is a full-featured desktop app with a slick, clean interface offering lots of useful advice and statistics – such as number of ads and trackers blocked and how much of your internet bandwidth was saved by these adverts not being downloaded to your machine. With so many users around the world still on metered connections, the ability to save even a few hundred megabytes from a download limit is nothing to be sneezed at.


Ad-blocking


AdLock is an impressive offering, blocking adverts in your browser,as well as those in other apps, as it runs as a stand-alone application instead of just an extension. While perhaps not quite as undetectable as it claims, it's still impressive how effective it is at blocking adverts on even the most restrictive of sites, including those with the full page pop-ups asking you to turn off your ad blocker before accessing the site. And if you do encounter issues, you can reach out through the AdLock client to flag up sites that aren't working correctly, and AdLock will amend its filter list.


Android friendly


Google is not a fan of ad-blockers, and so while you can download specific web browsers with ad-blocking built in, you can't get your hands on a system level ad-blocker anywhere on the Google Play store. AdLock, however, offers the Android .apk file for you to download and install yourself, no jail-breaking or rooting required, and no need to go to any suspect or dodgy websites.

Tested by Andreas Theodorou

Tested by Andreas Theodorou

AdGuard is a free, open-source stand-alone ad-blocker that works on Twitch, Youtube and more that comes with a 14 day free trial.

  • Free option

    Yes

    Pricing

    • Free extensions: $0/mth
    • 1 yr personal license/3 devices: $29.88/mth
    • lifetime personal license/3 devices: $59.99/mth
    • 1 yr family license/9 devices: $65.88/mth
    • lifetime family license/9 devices: $129.99/mth
  • Pros

    • Free version available
    • Impressive levels of customization
    • Support for multiple OS/devices
  • Cons

    • Customer support needs improvement
    • iOS version not updated in quite a while
  • Website


AdGuard is another stand-alone ad-blocker, similar to AdLock, available for multiple devices. As it's more than just a browser extension, it will work with not only the Twitch desktop app, but other apps that normally try to serve you adverts. This saves bandwidth and system resources that would otherwise go to waste downloading and displaying ads.


Multiple filters


AdGuard works by scanning your browser/app and identifying the ad-related components that are loaded on the pages you visit – scripts, images, CSS and so on. It will then search its database for filters that match these elements, and block adverts, trackers, pop-ups and more. AdGuard also filters code from websites before they load, stopping ads in their tracks before they download. What's more, because AdGuard blocks CSS, Javascript, and more, it's a great option for banishing ads on Twitch and other streaming services.


Stealth mode


AdGuard banishes ads and trackers, and has plenty of other features to keep your browsing sessions secure. For example, the service can prevent your search queries from being tracked on Google, Bing, and the like. It's also possible to strip tracking parameters from webpages, automatically delete third-party cookies, block WebRTC, location APIs and more besides. Some caution is warranted when using these features, however, seeing as a lot of websites these days won't work properly if you block TOO many things from working.


Multiple device protection


As well as the browser extensions, you can get AdGuard for Windows PCs, MacOS, iOS, Android and more. They've even got plans for their own private DNS servers and a product called "AdGuard Home" which is a router-level ad blocker. On top of an impressive suite of tools and customization options, you can even try it out for free for 14 days to decide if it's the right product for you.

Tested by Sam Dawson

Tested by Sam Dawson

uBlock Origin has been around for quite some time, offering an impressive level of advert and tracker blocking for browsers.

  • Free option

    Yes
  • Pros

    • Open-source client
    • Entirely free
    • Advanced options for technical users
    • Support for custom blocklists
  • Cons

    • No official support
    • Only available for browsers
  • Website


uBlock Origin (uBO) is a highly regarded (and free) and open-source cross-platform ad blocker that has effective anti-tracking capabilities. uBlock Origin is a fork of uBlock, so make sure you download the right one. While they might share a similar name, the two services are quite different when it comes to their abilities, and uBlock Origin is the one I'd recommend if blocking adverts on Twitch is your priority.


Blocklists


uBlock Origin has been around for quite a while now, and its list of features continues to grow. At heart, though, it's an effective ad blocking solution for Twitch, YouTube and more. It works by blocking domains known to belong to advertising or malware sources, using filter/block lists created by its enthusiastic community of fans and developers. You can even import custom blocklists or create ones yourself if there are some sites you'd like to support by allowing advertisements to be displayed.


Resource light


uBlock Origin is a lightweight ad-blocker with a small memory footprint and low impact on your system resources, making it a great choice for lowered powered systems where streaming HD content from sites like Twitch might already be an issue. You can even compare it to another popular ad-blocker, AdBlock Plus, here. The only thing to keep in mind is that the more filters you try to use, the more system resources uBlock Origin will need to run, so if memory/CPU are low, try to pick only what's most important.


Advanced features


The default settings for uBlock Origin will be more than enough for most people, but perhaps there's some specific thing on a website you don't like, some element on Twitch that's annoying you and you would rather not see it. uBlock Origin's element zapper and dynamic filtering allow you to target and remove specific elements from websites. And as uBlock Origin is entirely free and Open-source, all these advanced features come at no extra charge!

Tested by Danka Delić

Tested by Danka Delić

CyberSec comes as part of a NordVPN subscription, offering effective blocking of adverts, trackers, malware and other internet nasties.

  • Free option

    Yes
  • Pros

    • Free with NordVPN subscription
    • Simple to use for beginners
    • Effective ad-blocking while browsing
  • Cons

    • No customization options
    • DNS filtering is a bit heavy handed
  • Website


CyberSec is included with a NordVPN subscription, quietly working in the background to block in-app mobile ads and browser ads. On top of this, the service will also protect you from DDoS attacks, phishing scams, malware sites, and other online threats that are all too common these days. It does this by checking each site you visit against a blocklist of dangerous domains before allowing you access, making sure you're kept protected from known sources of malicious codes or scams.


Effective blocking


As I mentioned, CyberSec works by filtering your online traffic, comparing each site you visit to a list of known allowed/dangerous sites before it allows the site to load. This is known as DNS filtering, and it's a simple-yet-effective way to protect folks online. While it lacks the nuance of other options on this list, it's still a strong offering for younger or less tech-savvy users to make sure they don't fall prey to obvious scams or malicious websites.


Simple to use


NordVPN's CyberSec is an all-or-nothing tool. It's either on, or it's off. While it might lack the customization options or the in-depth features and statistics of other ad blocking tools, it's a useful value-added inclusion to Nord's already strong security and privacy offering. CyberSec does lag behind when it comes to blocking website trackers compared to some others on the market, but it is very effective at blocking known advert-serving websites and addresses.


Threat protection


A new addition to NordVPN's impressive ad blocking and security toolkit is NordVPN Threat Protection – an additional layer of protection above that offered by CyberSec, and one that's also free to all NordVPN subscribers. It brings additional tracker protection, ad blocking and malware protection, even scanning files before download to ensure that they're malware free. You can try this all out for yourself by downloading and installing NordVPN. If you're not completely happy with the service, or decide to go with one of our other recommendations, you can make good use of NordVPN's 30 day money-back guarantee.

Tested by Shaun Dewhirst

Tested by Shaun Dewhirst

  • Free option

    Yes
  • Pros

  • Cons

  • Website

What are the best ways to block ads on Twitch in 2022?

In order to block Twitch ads, you can either use a VPN, or install a dedicated ad-blocking app or extension. Both of these methods have their own pros and cons:

VPN

  • The best services require a paid subscription
  • Can introduce a small speed loss in your network as your traffic is being routed through the VPN provider's server

Adblocker

  • Doesn't secure any of your other communications
  • Doesn't open up any other streaming libraries or geo-locked content
  • Twitch actively looks to prevent them from working

Why should I use an ad-blocker for Twitch?

Twitch is notorious for serving a lot of ads. In fact, during particularly long ad breaks, some viewers are served up to 9 adverts in a row. Twitch viewers consider this to be less than ideal, understandably. The same ad sometimes even plays repeatedly at regular intervals throughout a stream in certain countries!

Locations like the USA, UK, Germany, and Sweden are some of the worst offenders when it comes to Twitch adverts. Thus, if you have an IP address belonging to one of those countries, you will need to either spoof your location using a VPN, or if you'd rather not commit to a paid subscription, use a reliable ad-blocker.

In this guide, we explain how to use a VPN to pretend to be in a country without Twitch ads. To avoid these ads and lengthy breaks, you'll want to connect to a VPN server in a location where adverts aren't shown, like Russia, Ukraine, Serbia, Mexico, and Costa Rica.

Unfortunately, even if you use an ad-blocker, it is possible that you'll continue to encounter issues. Many ad-blockers that work on the majority of websites may have difficulties with Twitch, leading to the infamous purple warning screen. This is why it's important to pick an ad-blocker that actually works (or preferably a VPN).

Check out the list below for the best VPN and ad-blocking services for Twitch:

Why should I use a VPN for Twitch?

Twitch is unusual because it does not serve ads in all countries. As a result, one of the best way to block ads on Twitch is to use a VPN to pretend to be in a different part of the world entirely. Places that are known to have either no ads (or fewer ads) include Russia, Ukraine, Serbia, Colombia or Costa Rica.

Of course, this is all subject to change, seeing as Twitch could begin dishing out ads in these locations at any point. Right now, the countries listed above (and probably some others) are ad-free. This makes a VPN the best way to block ads on Twitch and secure the safety of your browsing sessions and identifiable information, too.

A VPN works by concealing your real IP address from Twitch. By connecting to a server in a country where there are no ads, you can stream and enjoy live content without worrying about the purple screen or annoying pre-roll ads.

Best VPNs for gaming (and streaming)

How to use a VPN to block ads on Twitch

Using a VPN to block ads on Twitch is by far the easiest and most reliable method. Simply follow the steps below to get your VPN up and running with the streaming platform:

Get started with a VPN

  1. Subscribe to a Twitch VPN. Click through to the provider's website using the links above, and choose the subscription period that suits you best. Don't forget, you can take advantage of ExpressVPN's 30-day money-back guarantee!
  2. Download and install the VPN app onto your device.
  3. Connect to a VPN server in a country that doesn't have any ads. The closer the server is to you, the better your connection speeds should be.
  4. Head over to Twitch and stream ad-free content thanks to your VPN!

What is the Twitch purple screen error and how do I fix it?

If you have ever been watching your favorite streamer on Twitch only to be suddenly and rudely interrupted by the purple screen of death – you know firsthand how frustrating this issue is. But what is the purple warning, and why do users encounter it?

Twitch wants users to watch adverts because it's how the platform generates its revenue. Without advertisers, Twitch wouldn't be able to operate for free and still make a profit. That is why it works hard to prevent people from bypassing its ads with an ad-blocker.

The purple screen is Twitch's way of fighting back against people who use ad-blockers.

If Twitch detects that a user is running a third-party ad-blocker or script filtering tool, then it'll serve them with the purple warning – so you might come across this screen if the site figures out that you're using an ad-block extension. The purpose of the warning is to get you to turn your ad-block off.

The good news is that you should be able to stream Twitch without ads, or the purple screen, as long as you use a reliable ad-blocker for Twitch.

How to bypass the Twitch purple screen error

Disable or uninstall your ad-blocker and try a different one

The best way to prevent the purple screen is to disable (or uninstall) your ad-blocker and try a different one. Not all ad-blockers are able to do their job without being detected by Twitch. That is why we recommend using one of our recommended Twitch ad-blockers – or, better yet, a VPN!

Stream Twitch on the main Twitch website

You might also come across the purple screen when watching Twitch content via a third-party website. Ultimately, Twitch will be concerned that you're avoiding the ads that power the service – so it's generally a better idea to support your favorite Twitch streamers via the main site.

Final thoughts

While there are specialized ad-blockers available for only Twitch, many of these only seem to work for a short time, or intermittently at best. The services suggested in this guide work with Twitch as well as a long list of other in-demand streaming sites, so we feel like they're a better investment in the long run. Here's a reminder of the providers we recommend:

From $1.51/month

The best ad-blocker for Twitch, and it's absolutely packed with features.

ProPrivacy TrustScore:
10 out of 10
User-definable blockists
No
User-definable whitelisting
No
Open source
No

From $0.00/month

A stand-alone ad-block solution for Windows, iOS and mobile devices.

ProPrivacy TrustScore:
9.9 out of 10
User-definable blockists
Yes
User-definable whitelisting
Yes
Open source
Yes

From $0.00/month

uBlock Origin is both a highly effective and impressively customizable ad-blocking solution.

ProPrivacy TrustScore:
9.8 out of 10
User-definable blockists
Yes
User-definable whitelisting
Yes
Open source
Yes

From $0.00/month

NordVPN's bundled security solution for blocking ads, malware and more, at no extra cost!

ProPrivacy TrustScore:
9.7 out of 10
User-definable blockists
No
User-definable whitelisting
No
Open source
No

From $0.00/month

ProPrivacy TrustScore:
9.6 out of 10
User-definable whitelisting
Yes
Open source
No

Written by: Shaun Dewhirst

Shaun is a former IT Support Engineer who got tired of asking people if they'd tried turning it off and on again. After a few years working in that strange and nebulous industry known as "The Blockchain" he escaped a maximum security stockade to the Hertfordshire Underground. Today he survives as a reviewer of good coffee, bad movies and as a technical writer right here at ProPrivacy.

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